And Then Came Man

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Electree’s Solar Bonsai charges

 

Electree is a modern sculpture imitating a bonsai, the leaves of which are small photovoltaic panels.

 

It allows to recharge your mobile devices without using any other energy than light.

Usage is strictly limited to indoors.

 

Electree is delivered in modules which you assemble to create your own tree. This method makes it possible to produce an infinity of different shapes. You can model it according to your wishes and at the same time optimize the orientation of the photovoltaic cells and thus increase its effectiveness.

The structure is equipped with 27 cells, for a bulk height of roughly 40cm.

 

Energy produced by the panels during daylight is stored in a base hidden battery. Once charged, this accumulator feeds a USB port.

 

 

Keeping Cool…and Green

Air conditioning accounts for 14 percent of America’s home electricity use, and most of that electricity comes from coal. So when the weather warms up we should do everything we can to conserve energy as we keep cool. That means treating our air conditioners the same way we treat other energy-demanding appliances: by using them wisely and keeping them running efficiently. Here are some tips to help:

 

 

Invest in an energy-efficient air conditioner 

If you’re buying a new air conditioner, choose one for maximum energy efficiency. New air conditioners come labeled with an Energy Efficiency Rating (EER), a standard that lets you calculate how much electricity the air conditioner will consume. The higher the EER, the less it will cost you to operate the appliance to achieve the same level of cooling. 

New Technology Update!   A team of engineers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory developed a potentially revolutionary new air conditioning system. Unlike standard air conditioners, which compress a circulating liquid refrigerant such as Freon, this new system draws warm air through a cooling unit that contains a water-absorbing dessicants compound that cools the air by evaporation. The payoff? It uses up to 90 percent less energy! As of Fall 2010, the new AC technology still had a ways to go before it’s available to consumers, but it could be just two to three years before these new coolers become commercially available.

Avoid overcooling.
Don’t use or buy more cooling equipment capacity than you actually need. If you decide on central air conditioning, select the most energy-efficient unit that will cool the size space you have. Bigger is not better. A larger unit than you need will cost more to run and may not remove enough humidity from the air, the feature that some consumers like most about air conditioners.

Keep your cooling system well tuned.
Have it professionally maintained, and ask how the energy efficiency of the system may be increased.

Install a whole-house ventilating fan.
This can be put in your attic or in an upstairs window to cool the house, even if you have central air conditioning. According to Consumer Reports, a big fan working under the right conditions can cool and ventilate an entire house for about the energy cost of running an air conditioner in one room.

Set your thermostat as high as possible.
78 degrees F. is often recommended as a reasonably comfortable and energy-efficient indoor temperature.

◘ Source: http://www.earthshare.org

ENJOY YOUR SPRING | Kick Seasonal Allergies Naturally

 

Spring’s here, the trees and flowers are bursting into bloom, and you’re spending more time outside enjoying the sun. But hours later you start to sneeze and cough, your eyes water, and soon you have other cold-like symptoms. According to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA), you’re one of nearly 40 million Americans who have indoor/outdoor allergies that show up as the seasons change.

The not-so-great news for allergy sufferers: trees and grasses — the biggest culprits of seasonal allergies — are blossoming earlier and sticking around longer because of climate change. This means allergy season is getting longer, too!

If you’re a seasonal sufferer who’s looking for ways to treat allergies other than medication, here are some tips for natural relief:

    • First, get tested for regional allergies. The seasonal allergies you have depend upon where you live and what kind of allergens are in the air. If you live in an area with high humidity, your allergic reaction will likely be stronger as pollen thrives in these areas. Getting tested for allergies can help you determine what’s causing your symptoms and how best to treat them.

 

    • Go local for your allergy remedies. You may have heard the old wives’ tale that eating a spoonful of honey a day will cure your allergies. Well, it won’t cure them but it can significantly decrease your susceptibility to local allergens. Eating small, regular doses of honey or bee pollen supplements that are produced in your region can help your body build up a tolerance to pollen allergens, reducing the havoc they wreak on your sinuses. You can find locally produced honey and bee pollen at farmers’ markets in your area, as well as in many organic chain markets.

 

    • Some allergy specialists suggest that your diet plays a role in controlling symptoms. If you suffer from weed pollen allergies, what you don’t eat can make a difference. New York University allergist Dr. Clifford Bassett recommends avoiding melon, banana, cucumber, sunflower seeds, chamomile, and any herbal supplements containing Echinacea, as these can make symptoms much worse.Click here to check out more tips about foods and herbs like garlic and ‘butterbur’ that may help relieve or ward off symptoms.

 

    • Some experts swear by nasal rinses to wash out the allergens that get in your nose. Irrigation with neti pots, hydrating irrigating units, and squeeze bottles are becoming more mainstream – some experts think the treatment is even more effective than medication! Nasal irrigation – rinsing the nose and nasal passages, typically with a salt water solution – is a cheap and easy way to alleviate allergy symptoms. You can even do the rinse yourself at home. Check out this how-to video from the University of Michigan Health System.

 

  • Clean your home regularly to reduce indoor allergies. Twenty percent of Americans have not just one, but two kinds of allergies, so staying indoors isn’t always the best option when you’re trying to escape those irritants. Check out our green tips forcleaning your home in an eco-friendly way and make sure to get rid of all of those dust mites that make you sneeze.

Sadly, all the tissues you do end up using during allergy season can’t be recycled — used tissues just aren’t recyclable, despite being paper product. So consider buying tissues and toilet paper made from recycled paper or use a cloth handkerchief.

◘ Source: http://www.earthshare.org